In a series of dental articles, the Saskatoon dental team at Neesh Dental share interesting dental information and education. In our latest post, we discuss soda drinks and oral health

Do you drink too much soda?

It’s no secret there exists a strong link between soda consumption and tooth decay. Heavy soda consumption has also been linked to other health complications including diabetes, obesity and osteoporosis.

During the past generation, milk intakes have decreased while soda pop and 100 percent juice intakes have increased.  It has become a daily habit for a growing number of people, especially kids, teens and young adults. A steady consumption of soft drinks is one of the leading causes of tooth decay.
However, measures can be taken to prevent and reduce tooth decay. The conclusions of a recent study support contemporary daily dietary guidelines for children that include:

  • Consuming two or more servings of dairy foods
  • Limiting the intake of 100 percent juice to four to six ounces
  • Restricting other sugared beverages to occasional use

This doesn’t mean a person should never drink soda. In fact, drinking it in moderation may represent no harm at all.  However, substituting sugary, acidic carbonated beverages for water or intake of caloric food could be problematic in the long run.

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How soda attacks your teeth

The “Sip All Day, Get Decay” slogan isn’t just meant to be a catchy tagline – it’s literally the truth!

Sugar in soda combines with bacteria in your mouth to form acid, which attacks the teeth.

I’m ok as I only drink diet sodas!!

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Unfortunately, Diet or “sugar-free” soda contains its own acid, which also can damage teeth. Each attack lasts about 20 minutes and starts over with every sip of soda you take.

These ongoing acid attacks weaken tooth enamel. Kids and teens are most susceptible to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not fully developed.

You can avoid tooth decay and other health problems that arise from drinking too many soft drinks, other carbonated beverages, sports drinks, iced and sweet teas and other sweetened liquids (like fruit juices). Limiting your intake, brushing and flossing twice a day and visiting your dentist regularly will reduce your risk of tooth decay improve and/or maintain your oral health.

At Neesh Dental in Saskatoon, a beautiful, healthy smile that lasts a lifetime is our ultimate goal when treating patients.  Your personal home care plays an important role in achieving that goal.  Our team of Saskatoon dentists and support staff try to always share interesting articles, dental facts and dental hygiene tips so you can take good care of your teeth. Contact us today to book a Saskatoon dental appointment.

Saskatoon Dentist, NEESH Dental Clinic, (306) 665-8414
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